Hiram Silas Falor

M, (22 March 1829 - 1911)
Hiram Silas Falor. Posing in Dinner jacket without mustache.
Image credit: Courtesy of Ralph Falor
Birth*22 March 1829Coventry Township, Summit County, OH, USA1 
Marriage*7 April 1854Bertha E. Agard; USA1 
Marriage*16 July 1873Phoebe Ann Wright; Medina County, OH, USA; Marriage License D:459, T.C. Warner, Medina County, OH2,3 
Death*1911 
Burial*1911Glendale Cemetery, Arkon, Summit County, OH, USA; Section C, Lot 314 
Note*14 April 1865Glendale Cemetery, Arkon, Summit County, OH, USA; Hiram purchased Section C, Lot 31 at Glendale Cemetery. Records show this:
Plot owner, 360 Sq. Ft, sold 4/14/1865, deed # 319, vol 3, page 62. Transferred 7" adjacent lot to W.W. Falor 5/29/18794 
Witness: William Wallace Falor
Census*1880Columbus, Franklin County, OH, USA; Family History Library Film: 1255016, NA Film Number: T9-1016, Page Number: 137A5 
(Witness) Historycirca 1882"Hiram S, Falor, Akron; born in Coventry Township, at the farm upon which he now resides, March 22, 1829; the son of George Adam and Nancy (McCoy) Falor, who were early settlers of Summit County; he received a knowledge of the common branches in the schools of native township; when 19 years of age, became an apprentice in the harness-shop of Orrin Beckwith, of Akron, remaining there three years; then started a shop of his own, and carried on business some ten years. In the spring of 1860, he went to California; for a short time clerked in a wholesale store at San Francisco; then went to Humboldt Bay, crossed over the mountains to Salmon River and mined for four months. During the latter part of 1860, he moved to Virginia City, Nev., then a Territory, and opened the first harness shop ever started in that place; his establishment was called the “Pioneer Harness Shop.” He served as a petit juror in the first court ever held in Storey Co. During the early part of 1861, he organized the Virginia City Grays, and now was elected Captain of the company; when the rebellion was inaugurated the company tendered their services to the Government, but were declined by the national authorities who, at the time early in the war, did not wish to pay the expense of transporting the company to the seat of hostilities. In September, 1863, Falor returned to Akron, remaining for some five years in the city. In 1868, having purchased 30 acres from his father, he moved to Coventry Township, erected a residence on this land, a part of the old homestead, where his family now resides. In January, 1880, he was appointed by Hon. Joseph Turney, Treasurer of Ohio, to be Messenger in the office at Columbus; he also had charge of the Attorney General’s office and the Mine Inspector’s rooms at the Capitol. Mr. Falor was, on April 28, 1853, elected by the council of Akron to be Deputy Marshal of the place, and served for two years. He was Secretary of the Summit County Agriculture society for four years, and Assistant nearly ever since its organization: has been a member of the I.O.O.F. for over twenty years, and, as early as 1854, filled the office of Noble Grand in that order; has also been a Mason since 1852. He was Married, July 4, 1854, to Miss Bertia E, daughter of Benjamin and Bertia E. Agard, and by her had four children- Benjamin Stanton, died aged 8; Claude Emerson, now a member of Co. G, 10th Regiment of the regular army; Nancy Honora, died aged 7; Minnie Florence, now at home. His first wife died Jan. 2, 1872, and he married a second time to Mrs. Phoebe A. Lutz: two children being result of this union – Hiram, Garcelon and Phoebe. Mrs. Falor, by her former husband, is the mother of two children -Minnie C., now Mrs. Harry Flower; and Sylvester E. Lutz. Mr. Falor is now at the age of 52, is reasonable good health and circumstances."

Taken from Page 880 of an unknown book, Top of page is labeled “Biographical Sketches”. Article Provided by Harry Liggett, Transcribed by Allen Falor, 2006

6 
(Witness) History1892Hiram S Falor, born in Coventry, March 22, 1829, and now residing on a portion of the original family homestead, by appointment of council, served two years, 1853, ’54, as assistant marshal of the incorporated village of Akron, also served as deputy sheriff under Sheriff Seward, during the Parks murder trial in 1853-54; and from 1880 to 1884, faithfully and efficiently performed the responsible duties of messenger of the State treasury, in Columbus, during the administration of Treasurer Joseph Turney, and retaining the position two months under “Uncle Jo’s” Democratic successor, Hon. Peter Brady”

Source ”Fifty Years and Over of Akron and Summit County”, Page 720, 1892 by Ex-sheriff Samuel A. Lane. Article Provided by Harry Ball, Transcribed by Allen Falor, 2006

7 
(Witness) History1892Hiram Silas Falor born in Coventry, March 22, 1829; common school education; harness maker in Akron 15 years; in 1860, clerked in wholesale store in San Francisco, worked in mines and established pioneer harness shop in Virginia City, NEV.; in 1861, organized and as captain tendered Virginia City Guards to the government, but for lack of transportation facilities offer declined; 1863 returned to Akron, 5 years later removing to farm in Coventry, where he has since resided; was several years foremen of one of Akron’s pioneer fire companies; deputy village marshal two years; secretary Summit Country Agricultural Society two years and assistant secretary two years; messenger in office of State Treasurer Joseph Turney, at Columbus, 1880-84; member of police force, in charge of music hall during Ohio Centennial Exposition in 1888; member of Masonic order 35 years; filling all the offices from the lowest to highest in Summit Lodge, No. 50, L.O.O.F.; was U.S. census enumerator for Coventry in 1890. Mr. Falor was married to Miss Bertha E. Agard, July 4, 1854, who bore him four children, two of whom, only, are now living – Claude Emerson, now in regular army, at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and Minnie Florence, now Mrs. Elmer C. Ellsworth, of Coventry. Mrs. Falor dying January 4, 1873, Mr. F. was again married, to Mrs. Phoebe A. Lutz, of Westfield, Medina County, July 16, 1873. They have two children – Hiram Garcelon, born August 12, 1879, and Phoebe Fanny, born March 6, 1881.”

Source ”Fifty Years and Over of Akron and Summit County”, Page 715, 1892 by Ex-sheriff Samuel A. Lane. Article Provided by Harry Ball, Transcribed by Allen Falor, 2006

8 
(Witness) History1898"Hiram Silas Falor, a well-known citizen of Coventry Township, Summit country, Ohio, was born on the farm on which he now lives, March 22, 1829, and descends from one of the old pioneer families of the county, of German origin.

Adam Fehler, as the name was originally spelled, was the grandfather of subject, was a native of Germany, and was the founder of the present Falor family in Ohio. On coming to America, he first located in Pennsylvania, residing in Reading a few years, and then came to Ohio. Here he lived in Stark County some time, then bought a farm near Wolf Lodge, now within the corporation of the city of Akron, but died a number of years ago in New Portage, Summit County.

George Adam Falor, son of Adam Fehler, and father of Hiram Silas, the subject, was born in Lower Smithville, Northampton county, Pa. July 17, 1798, and in 1809 was brought to Ohio by his parents, and after having lived in Stark county about five years, located on what was later known as the Thornton farm, and which now constitutes a populous part of the city of Akron. He remained with his father until he was twenty-five years of age, and then bought from the government what is now the well known Falor farm of eighty-two acres in Coventry township, at $1.50 per acre, which he cultivated many years, besides following his trade of stonemason. George A. Falor was three times married—his wives being sisters, and named respectively, Nancy McCoy, Rachael McCoy, and Mrs. James (McCoy) Wilson. To the first marriage were born four children, viz: Milo J., deceased; James M., deceased; Lucinda, now Mrs. John Gottwalt, and Hiram S., the subject. To the second marriage was born George W., now deceased; Oliver P.; Mary A., now Mrs. J.A. Long; Thomas J.; William W., deceased; Henry C., deceased; Marytha E., married to Henry Acker; Lillie A., wife of George L. Adkins, and Perry T. To the third marriage no children were born. Mr. Falor was a captain of a militia company and also a drum-major in a company which he had aided in organizing. In politics he was a free-silver democrat and later a Republican, and was a man of great influence in his community. Having acquired a competency through his good management, he finally retired to Akron, where he died of dropsy June 29, 1868, an honored and venerated pioneer.

Hiram S. Falor, the subject, received a sound common-school education and early learned the trade of harness maker, a business he conducted for fifteen years with unqualified success in Akron. In 1860 he went to California for a time, clerked in a wholesale store in San Francisco, worked for a brief period in the mines, and then established the pioneer harness shop in Virginia City, Nev. In 1861 he organized the City guards, and, as captain of this company, tendered his services to the government at the outbreak of the Rebellion, but for the lack of means of transportation at the time, the tender was declined. In 1863 Captain Falor returned to Akron, and five years later removed to his present farm, of which mention has already been made, and which now comprises eleven acres just outside the corporation limits of Akron, and also of sixty-three town or building lots.

Captain Falor has ever been a consistent republican and as faithfully and ably filled many offices of honor and trust, political and otherwise. For several years he was foreman of one of Akron’s pioneer fire companies; was deputy village marshal two years; as secretary of the Summit county Agricultural Society two years, and for two years its assistant secretary; he was a messenger in the officer of State Treasurer Joseph Turney, at Columbus, from 1880 to 1884, and was a member of the police force in charge of Music Hall during the Ohio Centennial exposition of 1888; was census enumerator for Coventry township in 1890, and was a justice of the peace from 1893 to 1896. Fraternally, he is a Royal Arch Mason, and for thirty-five years has been a member of Akron lodge, No. 517, F. & A.M. As an Odd Fellow he has filled all the chairs of Summit lodge, No. 50, but is now non-affiliating.

Captain Falor was first married July 4, 1854 to Miss Berth E. Agard, who bore him three children, viz: Benjamin Stanton, who was born August 21, 1855, and died October 30, 1874; Claude Emerson, who was born December 23, 1856, served in the regular army 14 years, seven months and sixteen days, and was honorably discharge for disability; and Honora H., who was born January 18, 1859 and died January 27, 1865. Mrs. Bertha E. Falor died January 4, 1873, and ardent and consistent member of the Baptist church and July 16, 1873 Captain Falor married Mrs. Phebe A. Lutz, of Westfield, Medina county Ohio, a daughter of Marin and Fanny Wright and mother of two children by her first husband; Minnie, who died May 1, 1881, and Sylvester E. Lutz. To this second marriage of Captain Falor have also been born two children, Hiram Garcelon, August 12, 1879, and Phebe Fanny, March 6, 1881. Mr. And Mrs. Falor are members of Main Street (Akron) Methodist Episcopal church, of which the captain is a trustee, and toward the erection of which edifice he was a liberal contributor. He possesses to an unusual extent the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens and is universally recognized as one of the most public spirited and useful members of the community in which he has so long had his being."

Source "A Portrait and Biographical Record of Portage and Summit Counties" pages 252-253. Article Provided by Harry Liggett, Transcribed by Samantha Falor, 2005

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ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
George Adam Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherGeorge Adam Falor (17 Jul 1798 - 29 Jun 1868)
MotherNancy McCoy (c 1800 - 24 Mar 1829)

Children of Hiram Silas Falor and Bertha E. Agard

Children 1.Benjamin Stanton Falor9 (21 Aug 1855 - 30 Oct 1874)
 2.Emerson Claude Falor+1 (23 Dec 1856 - 24 Oct 1940)
 3.Nancy Honora Falor9 (18 Jan 1859 - 27 Jan 1865)
 4.Minnie Florence Falor+1 (9 Oct 1867 - )

Children of Hiram Silas Falor and Phoebe Ann Wright

Children 1.Hiram Garcelon Falor1 (12 Aug 1879 - 5 Nov 1904)
 2.Phoebe Fanny Falor1 (6 Mar 1881 - )

Citations

  1. [S4] Samuel A. Lane, Akron and Summit County.
  2. [S38] A.W. Bowen, "Hiram Silas Falor, pages 252-253."
  3. [S41] Harry Liggett, "Harry Liggett's research", Includes emails and various list including:
    Birth and death listings from the Summit County Probate Court.
    Marriages for Summit, Medina, Portage and Stark Counties in Ohio.
    Falor obituaries from the Akron Beacon Journal.
    Estate and land purchase records for Summit County.
    Information and tombstone photos from Mount Pleasant Cemetery in Akron Ohio.
  4. [S116] Jen Orum kardex, Glendale Cemetery, Glendale Cemetery, Akron, Summit County, OH, USA.
  5. [S25] 1880 US Census, , United States Census.
  6. [S63] Unknown, Hiram S. Falor Bio.
  7. [S60] Samuel A. Lane, Akron and Summit County, Vol 3.
  8. [S59] Samuel A. Lane, Akron and Summit County, Vol 3.
  9. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
Last Edited10 Dec 2018

Ida Jane Falor1

F, (9 February 1856 - )
Birth*9 February 18562 
Marriage*20 November 1892James Narance; Summit County, OH, USA1 
Married Name20 November 1892Narance1 
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
Abraham Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherMoses Falor1 (3 Feb 1827 - 6 Jun 1903)
Foster MotherHanna H. Wilson1 (20 Oct 1827 - 31 May 1882)

Family: Ida Jane Falor and James Narance

Citations

  1. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
  2. [S61] Unknown, unknown.
Last Edited27 Mar 2006

Irene Falor

F, (7 July 1905 - 10 January 1978)
Marriage*(?) Hulce1 
Birth*7 July 1905 
Death*10 January 1978Breckenridge, Gratiot County, MI, USA 
Married NameHulce1 
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
Abraham Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherClinton G. Falor (22 May 1867 - 9 Nov 1960)
MotherKatherina Kate G Milligan (Apr 1871 - )

Family: Irene Falor and (?) Hulce

Citations

  1. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
Last Edited18 Aug 2010

Irene Marie Falor1

F
Marriage*Richard Ward; Sonoma, Sonoma County, CA, USA2 
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
George Adam Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherGerald Francis Falor1,2 (11 Nov 1923 - Aug 1989)
Foster MotherRosemarie Stetson1

Children of Irene Marie Falor and Richard Ward

Children 1.Spencer Robert Patrick Falor-Ward2
 2.Jackson Frank Chavoya Falor-Ward2

Citations

  1. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
  2. [S112] Irene Marie Falor, "Email - Irene Marie Falor," e-mail to Kenneth Falor, Friday, August 9, 2013.
Last Edited27 Aug 2013

Irene Violet Falor1

F
Marriage*John Whipple2 
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
Abraham Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherFranklin Falor (29 Apr 1877 - 14 Jun 1940)
MotherPearl Snow

Family: Irene Violet Falor and John Whipple

Citations

  1. [S6] The Hovis Family Tree, online http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi
  2. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
Last Edited4 Jun 2005

Irvin Falor1

M
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
Abraham Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
FatherGeorge A. Falor (5 Jun 1849 - 23 Oct 1930)
MotherLavina Murry (7 Jun 1852 - 7 May 1931)

Citations

  1. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
Last Edited30 May 2005

Isaac Falor1

M, (8 January 1861 - 22 March 1905)
Birth*8 January 1861Swan, Marion County, IA, USA1 
Marriage*11 June 1879Metila "Metilda" Thomas; Swan, Marion County, IA, USA1 
Burial*1905Swan Cemetery, Swan, Marion County, IA, USA2 
Death*22 March 1905Swan, Marion County, IA, USA1 
Census*1880Swan and Union, Marion County, IA, USA; Family History Library Film: 1254354, NA Film Number: T9-0354, Page Number: 487D3 
(Witness) History25 March 1905
Taken from an article in the Des Moines, Iowa newspaper “The Journal”
The Date of the Article is the 24th of March the year is unknown, most likely 1905.
"Murder Near Swan

James Blee Shots and Instantly Kills His Half Brother, Isaac Failor

Killing Result of Family Feud.

Corner’s Jury Finds the Deed was done in the spirit of Murder—Quarrel of Long Standing was Aggravated by Trouble Over Private Road Way.

James E. Blee, a farmer residing one mile due south of Swan, shot and instantly killed his half-brother, Isaac Failor, about 8 o’clock on Wednesday morning, March 22. The killing occurred over a dispute about a private road. The weapon used was a Winchester shot-gun carrying cartridges heavily loaded with large sized shot. The shooting was at close range-not over 20 or 25 feet, almost the entire charge took effect in the right side of the victim’s neck, severing jugulars, carotid arteries and windpipe. Such a wound could not otherwise than inflict instantaneous death. Only one load was fired and almost every shot contained in the cartridge entered the man’s neck within an area of not more than 2 ½ or 3 inches in diameter, just under the lower jaw. A few scattering shots penetrated the upper half of the breast and right side of the chin, but the main portion of the charge entered the neck almost as a solid shot, tearing a ghastly hole where they entered and where they emerged at a point below and in front of the left ear. With the exception of the wound on the chin the face was uninjured.

     Failor fell perfectly limp and lifeless in his tracks. Blee remained in the vicinity only long enough to ascertain the deadliness of his aim and then he hurried to Swan where he surrendered himself to Constable Hammer.

     The Swan officers communicated with Sheriff Bybee, and at about the same time Mr. Blee called Attorney Hays and requested him to come on the first train to give the necessary legal advice.

     At 12:30 a party composed Sheriff Bybee, County Attorney Lyon, Attorney Hays, Geo. C. Inlow and The Journal representative started for the scene of the trouble. On arriving at Swan it was found that the sidewalks were thronged with men from nearly every neighborhood in the western part of the township- no one particularly excited or unduly wrought up over the occurrence, but everybody anxious to get the particulars of the unfortunate affair. The prisoner was under guard of Constable Hammer at the latter’s residence. The two women most of all others interested in the prisoner’s welfare, his wife and aged mother, were also at the Hammer home. No information had been filed and neither the Justice or the constable knew the results of the coroner’s investigation, which had been held during the forenoon. The latter circumstance arose from the fact that Coroner Miller had driven out to the scene from his home in Pleasantville and had empanelled his jury from among the farmer residing in the neighborhood of the tragedy.


     The crowds on the streets discussed the matter coolly and freely. Each succeeding story regarding the affair and how and why it had occurred was different in some particular from the one just previously narrated. Everybody in town appeared to be friends of both parties, and it was very noticeable that there was no expressed desire on the part of any one to reflect discredit or blame upon either the murderer or the murdered man. In short the prevailing opinion was to the effect that what had been expected for years had at last happened-that it was the culmination of a family feud; a vendetta of long standing, in which it was impossible to foresee who would be killed or the killer.

     After Blee had been legally placed under arrest on a warrant sworn out before Justice Logan, Sheriff Bybee, County Attorney Lyons and The Journal man drove out to the Failor home to view the scene of the tragedy and get all the information possible in regards to the matter. The county attorney desired to make the trip more especially for the purpose of interviewing Frankie, the 11 year old son of the victim, who was with his father when the shooting occurred, and who was the only witness to the affair. After viewing the scene of the shooting, the corpse of the murdered man and the general surroundings, the Knoxville party talked with the members of the family and the relatives and neighbors. Among the latter were those who had been attracted to the scene by the report of the gun and the screams of the women, and who had afterward assisted in removing the corpse to the house.

     After talking with a score, or perhaps more of interested and disinterested, we feel warranted in giving the following as a digest of all the information on the subject which it was possible to obtain under the circumstances.

     Isaac and William Failor, full brothers, and James E. Blee, their half-brother, resided on adjoining farms in Swan township for many years. William Failor and James Blee have lived near together on the county road one mile south of Swan; Isaac Failor’s 80 is a “shut in” tract a quarter of a mile south. Some years ago Isaac purchased a 20 foot strip off of the West side of the Blee 40, which gave him an opening out to the main road. Later Blee purchased or came into possession of a 40 acre tract directly south of Isaac’s east 40, and in order to get to that farm Blee not only necessarily had to use the private road but was also forced to go through Failor’s hog pasture. The men have quarreled on several occasions and are said to have had a regular fist-fight not longer than the holidays. William is only mentioned here because of the fact that he always “took sides” with his full brother.

     As the spring work began to open up on the farm and it became necessary for Blee to pass through his brother’s hop pasture in going and returning from plowing on the “south forty”. The quarrel was renewed. It is alleged that both parties swore eternal enmity towards each other and each had made threats against the other’s life. The “beginning of the end” came on Monday of this week when Isaac Failor closed the south end of the private lane by closing the gate and setting a large post in the middle of the road. After setting the post well in place Mr. Failor nailed the gate fast to it. On Wednesday morning James Blee took his shotgun, a hammer and some staples, and started out to “shoot gophers and tack up some loose wires.” When he finished the fence mending he was near his half-brother’s cattle sheds, and also on Failor’s premises. When he drove the last staple, he started north through the hog lot. Mr. Failor and his son Frank had been feeding the cattle and doing other work around the sheds. Blee was going directly towards home, his path leading past Failor’s barn. At that time Failor and his son started in the direction of the barn, following only a few rods behind Blee. The old quarrel started up with renewed vigor, both men threatening and Failor ordering his half-brother off of the premises Blee retreated until he was through the fence near the obstruction which Failor had erected at the end of the lane, and then halted to inquire why the post had been set and the gate nailed fast. To this query Failor is said to have replied: “To keep you out of my pasture, and I am going to see that it does that very thing to perfection.” One hot word then brought on another, each of the others more violently expressive than any that had preceeded. In a final burst of wild passion, Blee shot Failor dead, the latter falling in the mire of his own hog lot.

     The report of the gun instantly followed bt the wild screams of the women and children attracted neighbors who were a half mile away. The first men on the scene were J.S. and Joseph Viers. They were quickly followed by Samuel Wellons, Edmund Buckley and S.T. Welshhons. Owing to some mistaken idea that it is illegal to remove a corpse until after the coroner arrives, the murdered man was allowed to lay in the mud more than an hour before the more mature judgment of some of those present prevailed upon the others to carry the remains to the house.

When Dr. Miller, the coroner, arrived from Pleasantville he empanelled a jury composed of the following named persons- John A. Pattee, JasPhillips and Chas. Stradley. After due deliberation they rendered the following verdict:

     “We the jury, find that Isaac Failor came to his death by means of a shot gun in the hands of James Blee [and that the weapon was used] in a spirit of murder.”

     Whether or not Blee committed the deed under the impression that he was acting in self-defense has been a subject of considerable comment during the past two days. Blee says that he did not raise the gun to shoot until after Failor had made the remark “I’ll fix you” and made a motion to reach into his hip pocket for his revolver. C.E. Carpenter, of Swan, the gentleman who prepared the corpse for burial, says that Failor still had his mittens on when he fell. In the estimation of those who heard Blee’s talk about the victim “reaching in his pocket for a gun,” the fact that the mittens were still on after death controverts that story. Also, it developed later that Failor was unarmed, not having a single thing in his pockets except his purse. One man who viewed the remains a few minutes after death says that the right hand mitten was on and the other about half off the right hand grasping the left as if in the act of pulling off the other mitten when the death wound was inflicted.

     After returning to Swan county Attorney Lyons filled out a blank bond in the sum of $10,000. and turned the prisoner over to Constable Hammer with the understanding that he and Blee would go immediately into Polk county where some of the rich relatives of the murderer reside and get signatures to the document. Later it was learned that Blee and Hammer started to Des Moines on the evening of the murder for the purpose stated in the foregoing.

     Isaac Failor was a married man 46 years old. He leaves a wife and three children, Bertha, aged 22, Lydia, 17 and Frank 11.

     James E. Blee is 33 years of age and has only been married six months. Eva Ann Failor, the mother of the two men (she took her former husband’s name after separating from Blee’s father) is 73 years of age.

     William Failor and several relatives and friends of the dead man’s family, are making an effort to have the bond revoked and to get Blee placed in safe keeping. In perfecting these arrangements they have secured numerous affidavits which declare that the lives of several parties will be endangered if Blee is given his liberty pending the trial."

Note: The name “Failor” was changed from Falor by various members of the early settlers which was also a family feud.

Article Provided by Jerry Viers, Transcribed by Allen P. Falor in 2006
4 
(Witness) History12 October 1910Isaac is mentioned in a legal case regarding an issue with inheritance from Lydia Scanes Jackson, his aunt who died in 1907.

5 
ChartsFehler - Falor descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Fehler's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
John Adam Falor Jr's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
Eva Ann Falor's descendancy chart with all known descendants.
All known Viers related to the Falor family.
FatherEli Falor1 (7 Apr 1829 - 11 Nov 1864)
Foster MotherEva Ann Viers1 (13 Jan 1835 - 20 Jun 1935)

Children of Isaac Falor and Metila "Metilda" Thomas

Children 1.Bertha Ann Falor (16 Sep 1883 - )
 2.Lydia Ellen Falor (14 Jan 1886 - )
 3.Frank Falor1 (3 Oct 1893 - )

Citations

  1. [S7] Harry M. Ball, "Harry Ball's research", Includes an extensive collection of research papers, newspaper articles and hundreds of family documents complied during his research in the 1970's. A scan of his book can be downloaded from http://falor.com/images/Harry-Balls-Fehler-Book.pdf
  2. [S51] Unknown, Viers-Shook Family Record.
  3. [S25] 1880 US Census, , United States Census.
  4. [S52] James Blee Shoots and Instantly Kills His Half Brother, Isaac Failor, 24 March 1905.
  5. [S76] Unknown compiler, Falor v Slusser.
Last Edited7 Oct 2010